Funding

ConnectED | The White House

From the White House:

“Preparing America’s students with the skills they need to get good jobs and compete with other countries relies increasingly on interactive, personalized learning experiences driven by new technology. Yet fewer than 30% of America’s schools have the broadband they need to teach using today’s technology. Under ConnectED, however, 99% of American students will have access to next-generation broadband by 2017. That connectivity will help transform the classroom experience for all students, regardless of income.

The President also directed the federal government to make better use of existing funds to get Internet connectivity and educational technology into classrooms, and into the hands of teachers trained on its advantages. And he called on businesses, states, districts, schools, and communities to support this vision, which requires no congressional action. Following the 2014 State of the Union address, the President announced major progress on the initiative, highlighting commitments by the FCC and the private sector.Get more details about those commitments – and if you’re a school administrator, teacher, or student, find out how you can take advantage.”

via ConnectED | The White House.

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CEC eBook: 7 Steps for Success by Elizabeth C. Hamblet

From the CEC Website: “The transition from high school is always challenging for any high school student, but for young adults with disabilities, it can be even more difficult. In addition to adjusting to increased academic demands in an environment where there is less structure and support, students have to navigate a disability services system that is very different from the one they knew in high school. But with the proper preparation, students can enjoy success!

This practical guide explains how the system for accommodations works, describes students’ rights and responsibilities within that system, and employs the voices of seasoned professionals and college students to explain the skills and strategies students should develop while they are in high school to ensure success when they reach college. As a bonus, it also offers answers to questions students with disabilities frequently ask about disclosing their disability in the admissions process.”

via Item Detail.

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$2,000 NYSCATE Grants for Classroom Projects

Each year the New York State Association for Computers and Technology in Education (NYSCATE) awards up to 6 grants with a maximum value of $2,000 each for classroom projects that integrate the use of technology. The classroom project must be consistent with the NYSCATE mission, the New York State Learning Standards, and the NETS Standards.

For more information on applying for a grant, click here. The deadline date to submit a grant application is April 1.

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For Low-Income Kids, Access to Devices Could Be the Equalizer | MindShift

From MindShift: “No device should ever be hailed as the silver bullet in “saving” education — nor should it be completely shunned — but when it comes to the possibility of bridging the digital divide between low-income and high-income students, devices may play a pivotal role.

Access to the Internet connects kids to all kinds of information — and for low-income students especially, that access has the power to change their social structure by allowing them to become empowered and engaged, said Michael Mills, a professor of Teaching and Learning at the University of Central Arkansas during a SXSWEdu session last week.

‘For minorities and for low-income students who have these devices, it might be their only way to access the Internet, to get information about their own health, access to social media,’ he said. ‘And they’re using that as the agent to change their social structure.’

‘The Internet is about empowerment. If we take away this access because we think certain people aren’t going to use it right, we’re no better than governments who take away voting rights from minorities.’

Yet it’s those very students who are deprived of the right to use their own devices in schools, according to a recent Pew report showing that access to devices is noticeably different between higher and lower income schools: 52% of teachers of upper and upper-middle income students say their students use cell phones to look up information in class, compared with 35% of teachers of the lowest income students. And when it comes to blocking sites, 49% of teachers of students living in low-income households say their school’s use of Internet filters has a major impact on their teaching, compared with 24% of those who teach better off students who say that. In the same vein, 33% of teachers of lower income students say their school’s rules about classroom cell phone use by students have a major impact on their teaching, compared with 15% of those who teach students from the highest income households.”

Read more at… For Low-Income Kids, Access to Devices Could Be the Equalizer | MindShift.

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DRAFT: Promoting Grit, Tenacity, and Perseverance—Critical Factors for Success in the 21st Century

A draft document from the U.S. Department of Education — open for public comment: “We face a critical need to prepare children and adolescents to thrive in the 21st century—an era of rapidly evolving technology, demanding and collaborative STEM knowledge work, changing workforce needs, economic volatility, and unacceptable achievement gaps. This report takes a close look at a core set of noncognitive factors—grit, tenacity, and perseverance—that are essential to an individual’s capacity to strive for and succeed at important goals, and to persist in the face of an array of challenges encountered throughout schooling and life.”

Download, read and provide feedback!  http://1.usa.gov/Ybe739